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November 16, 2019

Future Vision

Future Vision Night Vision brings something new to Edmonton nightlife. by Cailynn Klingbeil An unused warehouse above a bottle depot may not be the obvious spot to pack 200 people in for a night of house music, but Andrew Williams and Nick Degree are aiming for memorable, not routine. The…

Future Vision

Night Vision brings something new to Edmonton nightlife.

An unused warehouse above a bottle depot may not be the obvious spot to pack 200 people in for a night of house music, but Andrew Williams and Nick Degree are aiming for memorable, not routine.

The local DJs’ music collective, Night Vision, has become known for exciting parties in unconventional locations, from Louise McKinney Park to a storage warehouse off 124th Street. 

Even when they head to more well-known spots – like the Bower or Starlite Room – the duo stand out by paying attention to detail, from distinctive posters to video projections at each show.

It has been that way since Degree, a talent buyer and music producer, and Williams, a marketing consultant, started Night Vision in February 2013, out of a shared feeling something was missing from Edmonton’s night life. 

They saw a gap for people passionate about house music – people who listened to it when they woke up in the morning, not only for a night out. 

“We weren’t seeing the nightlife we wanted to be part of,” Williams said. 

Night Vision started slow but strong, with just a few shows in its first year as Williams and Degree built a team of promoters and DJs. 

Williams described 2013 as their “foundation phase, where we were figuring out what we wanted to do and who wanted to work toward the same goal.” 

With the help of that team, Night Vision hosted an impressive 25 shows in 2014, bringing in big-name electronica acts including Kaytranada, Cashmere Cat, Bonobo, Cyril Hahn and Dusky.

The company also runs a record label and a clothing line, branches of the business that create a lifestyle for loyal fans.

“That’s the biggest difference we provide from other promotion companies,” Degree said. “We are providing people with an experience over a product, which translates to long-term sustainability. Night Vision is not just about going out.” 

For now, Williams and Degree each work part-time for Night Vision. With shows regularly selling out and an “incredible” response from Edmontonians, they may need to reconsider.

They are expanding their label, which has so far focused on local talent, to artists outside Edmonton, and are adding new products to the clothing line.  

A one-day outdoor winter dance party is being planned, and festivals are an obvious direction for Night Vision to take. But for a company built on providing intriguing and memorable experiences, it is safe to say fans can expect more. 

“We have some fun, scarily ambitious projects in the works,” Williams said. “That’s all I can say right now.”